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7 Min Marketing with Pam Didner


Nov 1, 2018

With my 2nd book launched, many people ask me why I wrote a Sales Enablement book instead of another content marketing book.

Well, there are professional and personal reasons:

One the professional front:

Sales and marketing tend to be treated as separate functions with limited integration, especially in enterprises. With the rise of digital, many marketing elements can be used for sales conversions and engagements. Here are two great examples:

Email marketing:

Email marketing used to be one of the key channels for marketing campaigns. Email marketing campaigns coupled with relevant content are now used by sales to run mini and personalized outreach to facilitate the sales process or act as a talk trigger.

Social media marketing:

Another example is the usage of social media I shared in my book. A sales team of a whiskey company was working hard to gain shelf space in liquor stores and supermarkets in a specific city. In order to get more shelf space with these stores, the sales team proposed that the company would run location-targeted paid social media ads to promote free tasting events at these stores with agreed-upon dates. The goal is to drive as much traffic as possible to the stores for tasting, and eventually, buying that particular brand of whisky. You know how it is. While you are in the store, you are likely to purchase other types of mixers or liquors which directly increase the stores’ revenue. The stores loved the idea that the brand was running geo-targeted ads to drive foot traffic. Once customers are in the store, they walk around, they likely to buy more products. I am thinking about my Costco run. I walk in with one thing in mind and walk away with a cart full of stuff.

In the digital age, marketers and salespeople should make an effort to evaluate how to better leverage marketing elements as sales engagements and negotiations.

To do that, it requires both sides to understand each other well. Marketing needs to understand sales processes and methodologies and sales needs to understand the various marketing channels that the company offers.

It sounds easy in theory, but it requires a massive amount of collaboration and communications. When we are all under deadlines, this is not something we can do on a continuous basis unless it’s mandated by the top or there is a process in place to facilitate it, which is what I talk in-depth in my book.

So, on the personal front

I simply wanted to challenge myself to write another marketing related topic. Then, I looked inward and asked myself what experience and learning I have that I can share from my 20 years of corporate experience. So, what was it? Oh, what about my experience of supporting the indirect and direct sales teams? We all know how hard it is to support them. I learned so much from them, yet they also learned from me about the evolution of digital marketing and how to use social media to their advantage. So, it was a win-win.

Originally, the topic was how marketing can better support the sales teams. In a way, we, marketers, are enabling sales. So, it morphed into the realm of sales enablement.

Most of sales enablement books are written by sales consultants, sales professionals, or sales trainers. This book was written by a marketer for marketers. If you are a marketer, it provides additional ideas for how you can better support your sales team. If you are a sales person, sales ops or sales enablement manager, it helps you to get inside your marketers’ heads and know what to ask for.

So, go to Amazon to order the book. If you are interested in the chapter outline or a free chapter, go to the pamdidner.com Books Page. You’ll see links for downloading a free chapter and chapter outline. If you can’t find it, just send me an email or contact me via any social media channels. I’ll personally send you the free chapter or chapter outline.

So, here is another idea to share with you. If you read the book and find nothing relevant that can apply to your marketing or sales roles, please schedule a call with me. I want to understand your challenges and see what I can do for you, OK?

Again, send me your marketing questions or thoughts via Twitter @pamdidner